3 Things to Ask in a Parent Teacher Conference

The parent teacher conference is an excellent time for teachers to meet parents and find out how their child is doing in class. You might say it’s the great “demystifier” for the rest of the year. Teachers have questions which are answered in teaching degrees. If parents have any questions, they should be resolved in … Continue reading 3 Things to Ask in a Parent Teacher Conference

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The parent teacher conference is an excellent time for teachers to meet parents and find out how their child is doing in class. You might say it’s the great “demystifier” for the rest of the year. Teachers have questions which are answered in teaching degrees. If parents have any questions, they should be resolved in the parent conference. Along with presenting their scores, it’s a great opportunity for you to get information from parents. Information from parents is so important it should be taught in teacher degree requirements. Here are 3 invaluable questions to ask in a parent teacher conference.

  1. What is your child like at home? They may be shy about this one. Try to resist clarification as you want the answer to not be coached. This information is highly valuable to you as it will give you points of contact with the child as you teach her/him throughout the year.
  2. What book is your child reading currently? This opens the conversation to discuss reading and how valuable it is in education. Encourage them to talk with their child about what book she/he is reading and ask them questions about the polt and characters.
  3. Do they have any questions for you? Give parents the opportunity to ask you questions. Let your guard down and professionally answer any questions they give you.

We always talk in parent teacher conferences but we sometimes miss a golden opportunity to listen to parents. When we open up and listen to parents, we get all sorts of persuasive tools to use with the student. For example, if a parent says: “Comic books, comic books, he wants to write them one day.” I can use that for example by saying things like:

“This math concept is something you could use when designing a comic book!” And hopefully I will get “buy-in” more readily from that student . The next time you meet with a parent, try these three questions and see if you are helped by them. I think parent input is worth more than a handful of teaching degrees.

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Goals Help Solve the Riddle of Setting up a Classroom

If you have clear and concise goals, your priorities and actions will be predicated upon them. After that, when review measurable progress toward goals, you decide if you are a success or not. Don’t let other people decide if you are a success or not in your classroom, only you should determine that.

20 Blogging Tips

Since I’ve been doing this blogging thing for over ten years now, I must have learned some things about it right? Not really. Just kidding. I’d say I have, though I wish I knew more. Blogging is an ever evolving practice and therefore can be a really confusing undertaking.

There are some simple things I’ve learned that make blogging more meaningful to me. They don’t necessarily improve traffic or income. I’ll leave those tips for the pros to give.

Here’s a short list of 20 things I came up with that are helpful to me, use ’em or toss ’em:

25 Blogging Tips

  1. Define what you want out of blogging.
  2. Set goals.
  3. Measure progress toward goals.
  4. Create a cool “About” page.
  5. Create attractive titles using related search terms.
  6. Pick a simple theme (I recommend one created by WordPress.org ie; Twenty Fifteen) and test, test, test.
  7. Use paragraph breaks about every 10 sentences or so. Do not write a whole page with no breaks.
  8. Embrace the mentality that posts have a 12-24 hour shelf life. Don’t expect it to be read after that.
  9. Write posts expecting them to be read years from now.
  10. Read other blogs.
  11. Subscribe to blogs that subscribe to yours.
  12. Comment on other blogs.
  13. Pay attention to what your “niche” is and become the resident expert.
  14. Use pictures when possible. Get yourself a good camera or get good at iPhoneography.
  15. Value real readers over “click through” traffic by replying to comments and commenting back.
  16. Provide entertainment.
  17. Every year or so, get a good quality profile picture on your blog.
  18. Be relaxed when you blog (it shows).
  19. Use Google Analytics or other service to find out which topics get the most reads.
  20. Enjoy yourself, try to not make blogging a chore.
  21. (bonus) Try blogging from Starbucks.

If you have any tips, please share with me in the comments!

The Road Less Traveled

pano school

I don’t usually read books twice but M. Scott Peck’s book gave me a lot to think about and I read it several times. The title is derived from Robert Frost’s classic poem, “The Road Not Taken.” Through years of studying and living the precepts in Frost’s poem, I’ve come to see it means something very different from “The Road Less Traveled.” In fact I have gained more wisdon from the poem than I did from the book.

In both cases it is speaking of being a grownup in life.

Making good choices based on what you know to be true, checking out your sources and above else, remaining open minded.

I don’t mean to judge anyone but along my journey, the times when I read the Bible and tried to follow a sort of Christianity were the times I was the most close-minded and most judgemental. Everyone must decide how open she/he wants her/his mind to be. My mind is all the way open and I intend to keep it that way. Oh, and there’s room for more!

If you are interested in these themes, M. Scott Peck’s bestseller from way back, “The Road Less Traveled” might be right up your alley.

Tell us about a book you can read again and again without getting bored — what is it that speaks to you?

Source: Second Time Around | The Daily Post